Courage Campaign in the News

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Dianne Feinstein has been a fixture of Democratic politics in one of the country’s most liberal states for four decades. But now, as she seeks a fifth full term in the US Senate at the age of 84, the state’s progressive wing isn’t looking for stability: It’s looking for someone who can more fully embody complete resistance to President Trump.

“The base is just sort of not gonna take it anymore as far as compromising our values,” said Eddie Kurtz, president of the Courage Campaign, a progressive group in California. “We’re sick of running on kinda, sorta what we want.”

Gun-regulation activists went to Rep. Dana Rohrabacher’s 48th Congressional District office in Huntington Beach on Monday to deliver 500 orange carnations and 58 white roses symbolizing the people injured and killed in the Oct. 1 mass shooting at a country music festival in Las Vegas.

Courage Campaign, a Los Angeles-based group that organized the effort, said it was calling on Rohrabacher (R-Costa Mesa) to take action on gun safety legislation.

Every president since Jimmy Carter has released his tax returns while running for the country’s highest office, a post-Watergate acknowledgment that the American people might have an interest in knowing their president is not a crook. But President Donald Trump famously broke that tradition.

For many Americans, the break provided an unexpected civics lesson: that the ritual airing-out of each presidential candidate’s financial laundry isn’t mandated by the U.S. Constitution or statute, but by mere expectation.

“It turns out that this was just a voluntary agreement, not a law,” said Eddie Kurtz, executive director of the Courage Campaign, a progressive advocacy organization supporting the bill. “So there’s a very unique opportunity here to make it law.”

Groups of demonstrators joined some Los Angeles Chargers as they protested once again during the national anthem ahead of their game against the Eagles at the StubHub Center Sunday.

Members of the California-based Courage Campaign, Democracy for America, activists from Black Lives Matter and other organizations participated in the protest ahead of the game, which started around 1 p.m.

And as of Wednesday, the rotating billboard with a scowling Trump, was still staring at motorists traveling between San Francisco and Oakland. However the discrepancy over whether the billboard was up or not had many people scratching their heads. News trucks were sent out. Erroneous stories were published.

Zipp later said in an email that there was an "internal miscommunication" about whether the billboard was staying up or not. The miscommunication came about 3:30 p.m. PST on Tuesday, according to Madison Donzis, spokeswoman for the California-based Courage Campaign, which paid $1,500 to have the billboard up from Monday until Sunday.

The billboard is the work of a group called the Courage Campaign, whose president says it's time to get the country behind the removal of Mr. Trump. They want to pressure the Republican-controlled Congress, which has shown no inclination to impeach the president.

"We are a grassroots organization. If we are not calling for impeachment, given what has happened, who is?" asked the organization's president and executive director, Eddie Kurtz. He points out that more than a million people cross the bridge every day, so it's an incredibly strategic place to have a billboard.

The billboard is the work of a group called Courage Campaign whose president says it’s time to get the country behind the removal of Mr. Trump. They want to pressure the Republican-controlled Congress which, so far, has shown no inclination to impeach President Trump.

“We are a grassroots organization. If we are not calling for impeachment, given what has happened, who is?” says the organization’s president and executive director, Eddie Kurtz. He points out that more than a million people cross the bridge everyday, so it’s an incredibly strategic place to have a billboard.

The Courage Campaign, which spearheaded the billboard idea, argues that Trump should be booted from the White House for "attempting to obstruct an investigation into potential wrongdoing by his presidential campaign, refusing to divest from his businesses, publicly supporting white supremacist violence in Charlottesville, and recent decisions to eliminate DACA protections for more than 800,000 young immigrants."

Donations from Californians who support the Courage Campaign helped make the billboard become a reality, according to billboard organizers.

Single-payer advocates in the state said while they’re thrilled by Sanders’ proposal, their primary efforts will still be in California where such a plan is more politically possible. The progressive group Courage Campaign convened liberal activists this week in Sacramento to strategize on how to push ahead with a state-level health-care overhau

“As long as there’s a Republican Congress and a Republican president, everyone knows this is an organizing tool rather than an immediate threat to pass,” said Eddie Kurtz, the group’s president. “It’s wonderful to have that goalpost out there.”

California would be hardest hit state in the nation, with an estimated cut of $28 billion to its health care system by 2026, according to the left-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Other states that would face severe budget cuts include New York, Massachusetts and Maryland.
Activist groups, including the Courage Campaign and Indivisible, will protest outside the office of Republican Congressman Ed Royce, in Brea, Thursday at 11 a.m. Protestors are scheduled at the offices of Rep. David Valadao on Thursday in Bakersfield and Friday in Hanford, both at 4 p.m. Other House Republicans, including Dana Rohrabacher of Costa Mesa, Steve Knight of Lancaster, Jeff Denham of Turlock and Mimi Walters of Laguna Niguel, were the focus of other protests this week organized by the advocacy group Health Access.

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